Dr. Ellen Ochoa- Director of Houston's Johnson Space Center

Dr. Ellen Ochoa, a veteran astronaut, is the 11th director of the Johnson Space Center. Prior to being named director in 2012, she served the center as deputy director for five years.

Ochoa is JSC's first Hispanic director, and its second female director. Dr. Carolyn L. Huntoon served as JSC director from 1994-95.

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Annie Jump Cannon

 

Oh, Be A Fine Girl--Kiss Me! This phrase has helped several generations of astronomers to learn the spectral classifications of stars. Ironically, this mnemonic device, still used today, refers to a scheme developed by a woman. 

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Rosie the Riveter- inspiring Women in STEM since 1942

Our organization is inspired by and named after Rosie the Riveter, the symbol of the women who stepped up and stepped in to take on previously male-dominated roles in factories and heavy industry when men left their jobs to fight in WWII.  While widespread cultural references encouraged women to undertake such work (a song, promotional film, an image by Norman Rockwell, etc.), it was artist J. Howard Miller’s representation of Rosie the Riveter on the “We Can Do It” poster he designed for the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company in 1942 that has become the iconic image of Rosie the Riveter and her can-do attitude.  As an organization, we aim to inspire girls to take a similar “We Can Do It” approach to STEM, and hope you will support girls in STEM by funding our modern adaptation of the symbol that, some argue, changed a generation.

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Jeanne Gang- American Architect

Jeanne Gang Architect Studio Gang Chicago, IL Age: 47 http://www.macfound.org/fellows/4/

Jeanne Gang,  (born March 19, 1964, Belvidere, Illinois, U.S.), American architect known for her innovative responses to issues of environmental and ecological sustainability. She employed sustainable-design techniques—such as the use of recycled materials—to conserve resources, decrease urban sprawl, and increase biodiversity. She is perhaps best known for her. Aqua Tower, an 82-story mixed-use skyscraper in downtown Chicago that, when completed in 2010, was one of the tallest buildings in the world designed by a woman.

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Ruth Patrick- a Pioneer in Science and Pollution Control Efforts

Ruth Patrick

Dr. Ruth Patrick, an adviser to presidents and the recipient of distinguished science awards, was one of the country’s leading experts in the study of freshwater ecosystems, or limnology. She achieved that renown after entering science in the 1930s, when few women were able to do so, and working for the academy for eight years without pay.

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Maria Klawe - Mathematician and President of Harvey Mudd

klawe_maria_wcw_16dec15.jpg“Any kind of person can be a scientist.” 

Maria Klawe began her tenure as Harvey Mudd College’s fifth president in 2006. A renowned computer scientist and scholar, President Klawe is the first woman to lead the College since its founding in 1955.

 

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Gertrude B. Elion - Nobel Prize winning biochemist

wcw_gertrudeelion_9dec15.jpgBiochemist and pharmacologist Gertrude B. Elion had an impressive career, during which she helped develop drugs to treat many major diseases, including leukemia, malaria and AIDS. She won a Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1988. Gertrude Elion died on February 21, 1999, in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

 

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Throwback Thursday - Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin

tbt_Dorothy_Crowfoot_Hodgkin.jpgThis week for #ThrowbackThursday, we're looking at Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994). She was a leader in the field of X-ray crystallography, winning the 1964 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for solving the structures of penicillin and vitamin B12. Five years later, she was also the first to solve the complex structure of the insulin molecule.

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Barbara McClintock - Nobel Prize winning geneticist

wcw_mcclintock_2dec15.jpg"If you know you are on the right track, if you have this inner knowledge, then nobody can turn you off ... no matter what they say." Barbara McClintock

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Katherine Johnson - NASA mathematician

 

Katherine Johnson said: "My dad taught us 'you are as good as anybody in this town, but you're no better.' I don't have a feeling of inferiority. Never had. I'm as good as anybody, but no better."

But probably a lot smarter. She was a "computer" at Langley Research Center "when the computer wore a skirt," said Johnson. More important, she was living out her life's goal, though, when it became her goal, she wasn't sure what it involved.

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